Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island

Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island: Traditions of Oahu: Asia-Pacific Digital Library

Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island: Traditions of Oahu: Asia-Pacific Digital Library

Seasons and Months

As in most tropical climates, there are two seasons in Hawai’i, the cooler wetter season called Ho’oilo, and the hotter, drier season called Kau. Both seasons last about six months. In ancient times, the months were marked by the appearance of different stars and constellations in the eastern sky at sunset.  Source: apdl.kcc.hawaii.edu/oahu/stories/months.htm

Where has all the Limu Gone?

Where has all the Limu Gone? Maui used to have an abundant resource of edible and useful seaweed. It was harvested, eaten, and utilized as part of the traditional Hawaiian culture and in more modern times. Throughout history Maui beaches and shorelines were synonymous with seaweed. In the modern era there had been so much seaweed and algae (including both native and non-native varieties) that huge rafts of seaweed would wash ashore on many beaches building up daily. Many people picked up the fresh limu daily, for food and for other uses. If left exposed on the beach, the seaweed would start rotting and could get quite stinky. This “stinky seaweed” problem was even the cause of many complaints, to the point where some resorts had even dedicated large beach-cleaning machines to clear away the almost daily deposits of seaweed. Huge seaweed deposits were common sites on, the north shore, south shore, and west side. But in the last 2 decades, most of that has suddenly disappeared? So why after so many decades of excessive seaweed did it suddenly vanish on all three coastlines?

beachmaster-machine-clearing-limu-seaweed-in kihei-maui-hawaii
Beachmaster tractor clearing away seaweed deposits on a Kihei Beach, Maui Hawaii.

Coral reefs provide protection from storms and rising sea levels, Stanford research finds

Coral reefs provide protection from storms and rising sea levels, Stanford research finds

Coral reefs provide protection from storms and rising sea levels, Stanford research finds

By breaking up waves, coral reefs protect an estimated 200 million people from natural disasters and rising sea levels.

Source: news.stanford.edu/news/2014/may/coral-reef-protect-051314.html

Sand Mining

Sand Mining County Meeting

Sand Mining

Recent Updates On Monday, September 18th, 2017 at 1:30 PM the County Council’s Infrastructure & Environmental Management (IEM) Committee will meet once again to discuss and possibly vote to pass a sand mining moratorium bill out of committee. Stand up for ʻiwi kūpuna and our environment –

Stand up for ʻiwi kūpuna and our environment – come testify in support of the moratorium (County Council Chambers – 8th Floor, 200 S. High St., Wailuku) or send your testimony to iem.committee@mauicounty.us

Source: mauisierraclub.org/sand-mining/