Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

As one of Hawaii’s most popular resort destinations, Ka‘anapali dates to about 1962, when the Royal Lahaina Resort opened. The Sheraton followed a year later, and soon resorts were popping up periodically into the early 1980s. For visitors, there are few more accessible resort locations than Ka‘anapali. The situation for residents–who are guaranteed coastal access–the …

Source: mauitime.com/news/law-enforcement/free-parking-the-county-of-maui-finally-gets-serious-about-ensuring-public-beach-access-parking-in-kaanapali/

SHORELINE HAZARDOUS WASTE IN PUBLIC BEACH PARK IGNORED BY COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION DIRECTOR

1.The title of this article should be: SHORELINE HAZARDOUS WASTE IN PUBLIC BEACH PARK IGNORED BY COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION DIRECTOR. 2. Although the Ironwood tree area where the campers were is looking pretty good right now, that was because of a beach clean up organized by a private citizen. The real problem area is over on the Paia Bay side (Lime Kiln). There is a LOT of trash there. The County clean up consisted on pushing the rubbish around with a couple of backhoes. I’m sure they carted some away, but it’s still trashed. Way more than an “occaisonal soda can or plastic fork.” Here’s a link to a video shot just a few days ago on 9/20/17. This was provided to the Maui News reporter that authored this article on 9/20/17. (sorry for the poor audio) It’s only a small part of the area becasue it’s kind of sketchy going back there in the bushes with a camera rolling: https://youtu.be/Z3bNXJuqHa0 3. David Nakama’s (Housing and Human Concerns) suggestion of clearing the brush back there is a great one! Is anyone listening?! 4. I’m really pissed off at hearing that The Director of the Parks and Recreation Department, Mr, Buenconsejo, can’t figure out what to do with the leftover batteries, oils, and needles littering our shorline areas in a PUBLIC BEACH PARK which happens to be adjacent to a community youth center! Mr. Buenconsejo’s complete disregard for the health and safety of our beachgoing public and our natural shoreline areas along with his inability to find safe way to dispose of the toxic and hazardous waste (that he is obviously aware of) suggest to me that he’s not even close to being qualified to manage our public areas. 5. While I am sympathetic to anyone that is homeless for any reason, I am not sympathetic to anyone that allows our natural public areas to be desecrated with trash, hazardous waste, needles, human waste, etc, etc. I don’t blame the homeless for this, I blame the administration at the Parks and Recreation Department and the lack of leadership in the Mayor’s Office. The Big Island Mayor just set up a Safe Zone for homeless folks that provides showers, restrooms, social services, and other resources to help people get back on their feet and to keep people from living on the beach. It won’t solve all the problems, but it’s a creative program that doesn’t cost much money. In fact, with a caretaker and a few improvements, the Lime Kiln area could, in fact, be an awesome safe zone for homeless people, but it would need some management and administration skills that are non-existent at The Parks and Recreation Department at this time. 6. I’m looking forward to hearing what the Environmental Protection Agency says about our Park Director acknowledging that we have batteries, oil and needles in a shoreline area, in a Public Beach Park, next to a Community Youth Center. 7. I could tell Mr. Buenconsejo where to put the hazardous waste, but then I’d be doing his job. 8. The comment about homeless folks knowing exactly when the Park Rangers are out there is laughable. Do they send out announcements or something? Geez!

*This is an excerpt from that full story “Baldwin Beach” originally posted on MauiNews.com

https://youtu.be/Z3bNXJuqHa0

Beach Access

Public spaces include access points and beaches.

  • The public has an inherent right of access to and along all beaches and shorelines. Generally, local authorities have the primary authority to develop and maintain public access to and along the shorelines.
  • Existing public coastal access opportunities must be retained, new or increased public access opportunities should be provided, and development must not be allowed to interfere with public access. Furthermore, beaches that provide access for water-oriented recreational activities should be protected for such uses.
  • The public should be afforded full and fair access to beaches, which are public trust resources, by minimizing the possibility of impediment; including development, subdivision or land use zoning change; or deterring obstacles, including gates, fences, hired security, misleading signage, rock walls, shrubbery or other blockades, being placed upon public rights of way to beach access.
  • Means of access to the beach (“vertical” or “perpendicular access”) should be readily available and secured so as to maximize access along the coast and should not be overly burdensome for the potential beachgoer to utilize.
  • There exists a cultural value of active visitation to the beach as part of traditional, historical and/or customary practices.
  • Wherever appropriate, public facilities, including parking areas, showers, bathrooms, changing areas and other amenities, should be made available in a manner that mitigates the adverse impacts, environmental, social or otherwise of public access.

Source: http://www.beachapedia.org/Beach_Access

Beach Management Plan for Maui

Beach Management Plan for Maui – 1997

Prepared by:

University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service
and  County of Maui Planning Department
In Hawai’i and the Pacific, taking care of the islands’ coastal resources is critical to people’s livelihoods, lifestyles, and general well-being. More effective resource management will ensure sustainable use of these resources while providing long term benefits to Hawai’i residents, as well as ensuring a quality visitor experience. Ninety percent of Hawai’i’s plants and animals, more than10,000 species, exist nowhere else on Earth. The only tropical rainforests in the U.S. are found in Hawai’i, as well as 84 percent of all coral reefs under U.S. jurisdiction. There is no private ownership of coastal resources. Hawai’i’s beaches, its nearshore reefs, the ocean, and all that impact them from land, are at the heart of its appeal and an annual economy that accounts for more than $10 billion in
tourism revenues. Hawai’i is also steeped in an ancient cultural heritage that reflects a life-affirming relationship with the islands’ landscape, native species and ecological processes. At the same time, attempts to protect delicate ecosystems are balanced with increasingly overpopulated coastlines and unharnessed business development.

http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/occl/files/2013/08/BeachManagementPlanMaui.pdf

 

Kanaha Beach Park

Kanaha Beach Park

Kanaha Beach Park is a long stretch of publicly owned wild coast on the North Shore of Maui (Hawaii).   It is comprised of white sand beaches, coastal dunes, wetlands, and a developed beach park.   Kanaha Beach provides recreation for many folks on Maui, including windsurfers, surfers, kiteboarders, pole fishermen, divers, canoe paddlers, campers, joggers, bikers, general beach goers, and many others.   Kanaha Beach also supports some of the last remaining strongholds of native coastal plants and animals left on sand dunes and in wetlands along the north shore of Maui.

Volunteer

The beautification and restoration of Kanaha Beach has been on-going for decades, and is only possible with regular support from the community.   To volunteer to help Kanaha Beach, call Jan Dapitan at Community Work Day (808)877-2524, e-mail cwdkhb@pixi.com, or visit www.cwdhawaii.org.   For more volunteer opportunities on Maui visit www.hear.org/volunteer/maui.

The following have volunteered time, provided funding, or given resources:   Kiwanis, Kiwins, Girl Scouts, Boy scouts, Eagle scouts, Latter Day Saints, Jewish Congregation, Baldwin High School Science Club, Seabury Hall High School, Maui High School, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Americorps (local and national), Lae Ula o Kai Canoe Club, Kiteboarders Association of Maui, Maui Rotary, Goodfellow Construction, Hoolawa Farms, Maui County Public Works Department, Maui County Waste Water Treatment Department, Maui County Parks and Recreation Department, Maui County Correctional Center, Maui County Police Deptartment, Positive Outreach Initiative, State of Hawaii Emergency Environmental Workforce, United States Geological Survey Biological Resources Division, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Tri-Isle Resource Conservation and Development, and scores of other individuals, agencies, and organizations.

http://hear.org/naturalareas/kanahabeach/index.html