The Fight To Save Pagan Island From US Bombs

The Fight To Save Pagan Island From US Bombs

SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands — For Sowmangeyong Daniel Kaipat, the question wasn’t whether to enlist in the military after high school. It was what branch of the service to join. “If you think you’re man enough to earn the title of Marine, then come with us,” Kaipat remembers a Marine Corps recruiter telling him. “But …

Source: www.civilbeat.org/2016/12/the-fight-to-save-pagan-island-from-us-bombs/

Papahānaumokuākea Expands, Now Largest Conservation Area on Earth

Papahānaumokuākea Expands, Now Largest Conservation Area on Earth

Today, President Obama announced that Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, located in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, will expand from 139,818 square miles to 582,578 square miles. That’s bigger than the total land area of the state of Alaska — and makes Papahānaumokuākea larger than any other land or ocean conservation area on Earth.

Source: sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/aug16/president-announced-expansion-of-papahanaumokuakea-marine-national-monument.html

Kanaha Beach Park

Kanaha Beach Park

Kanaha Beach Park is a long stretch of publicly owned wild coast on the North Shore of Maui (Hawaii).   It is comprised of white sand beaches, coastal dunes, wetlands, and a developed beach park.   Kanaha Beach provides recreation for many folks on Maui, including windsurfers, surfers, kiteboarders, pole fishermen, divers, canoe paddlers, campers, joggers, bikers, general beach goers, and many others.   Kanaha Beach also supports some of the last remaining strongholds of native coastal plants and animals left on sand dunes and in wetlands along the north shore of Maui.

Volunteer

The beautification and restoration of Kanaha Beach has been on-going for decades, and is only possible with regular support from the community.   To volunteer to help Kanaha Beach, call Jan Dapitan at Community Work Day (808)877-2524, e-mail cwdkhb@pixi.com, or visit www.cwdhawaii.org.   For more volunteer opportunities on Maui visit www.hear.org/volunteer/maui.

The following have volunteered time, provided funding, or given resources:   Kiwanis, Kiwins, Girl Scouts, Boy scouts, Eagle scouts, Latter Day Saints, Jewish Congregation, Baldwin High School Science Club, Seabury Hall High School, Maui High School, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Americorps (local and national), Lae Ula o Kai Canoe Club, Kiteboarders Association of Maui, Maui Rotary, Goodfellow Construction, Hoolawa Farms, Maui County Public Works Department, Maui County Waste Water Treatment Department, Maui County Parks and Recreation Department, Maui County Correctional Center, Maui County Police Deptartment, Positive Outreach Initiative, State of Hawaii Emergency Environmental Workforce, United States Geological Survey Biological Resources Division, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Tri-Isle Resource Conservation and Development, and scores of other individuals, agencies, and organizations.

http://hear.org/naturalareas/kanahabeach/index.html

Coral Reef Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Upland Activities

Coral Reef Ecosystems, Water Quality, and Upland Activities

The health of beaches is closely tied to the health of the coral reef ecosystem, which is itself closely tied to upland land practices. Hence, effective beach management requires a geographically broader approach
known as integrated coastal zone management. Although this report has focused mainly on the shoreline area-the beach, the dunes, and the coastal plain-we have included some recommendations for more effective protection of the coral reef ecosystem and better management of upland land practices.In many cases, improper control of runoff at agricultural lands and construction sites, even those far from the coast, has degraded the water quality of coastal areas. For example, recent construction without adequate erosion control measures for the Maui Ocean Center has led to frequent silt plumes in Ma’alaea Bay and negative impacts on the coral reef. Silt diminishes light penetration and eventually settles out on
the seafloor. This harms coral and other marine organisms (e.g.,
foraminifera, an important component of beach sand) and limits safe and enjoyable ocean recreation. Runoff also transports nutrients, pesticides,
and other pollutants to coastal waters compounding the impacts on water quality. [excerpt from the “Beach Management Plan for Maui”]