Paia Secret Beach | Maui Guidebook

Paia Secret Beach | Maui Guidebook

Paia Secret Beach | Maui Guidebook

Rating: In a nutshell: If you like to get naked on the beach without a ton of company, this is a good place to go. Relatively private and out of the main-flow of people, rarely anyone but folks who live here end up at this beach. Minuses: Parking; better beaches adjacent. Sound-bite: “Hey Moonbow, can I borrow your organic hemp …

Source: mauiguidebook.com/beaches/paia-secret-beach/

Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

Free Parking: The County of Maui finally gets serious about ensuring public beach access parking in Kaanapali – Maui Time

As one of Hawaii’s most popular resort destinations, Ka‘anapali dates to about 1962, when the Royal Lahaina Resort opened. The Sheraton followed a year later, and soon resorts were popping up periodically into the early 1980s. For visitors, there are few more accessible resort locations than Ka‘anapali. The situation for residents–who are guaranteed coastal access–the …

Source: mauitime.com/news/law-enforcement/free-parking-the-county-of-maui-finally-gets-serious-about-ensuring-public-beach-access-parking-in-kaanapali/

SHORELINE HAZARDOUS WASTE IN PUBLIC BEACH PARK IGNORED BY COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION DIRECTOR

1.The title of this article should be: SHORELINE HAZARDOUS WASTE IN PUBLIC BEACH PARK IGNORED BY COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION DIRECTOR. 2. Although the Ironwood tree area where the campers were is looking pretty good right now, that was because of a beach clean up organized by a private citizen. The real problem area is over on the Paia Bay side (Lime Kiln). There is a LOT of trash there. The County clean up consisted on pushing the rubbish around with a couple of backhoes. I’m sure they carted some away, but it’s still trashed. Way more than an “occaisonal soda can or plastic fork.” Here’s a link to a video shot just a few days ago on 9/20/17. This was provided to the Maui News reporter that authored this article on 9/20/17. (sorry for the poor audio) It’s only a small part of the area becasue it’s kind of sketchy going back there in the bushes with a camera rolling: https://youtu.be/Z3bNXJuqHa0 3. David Nakama’s (Housing and Human Concerns) suggestion of clearing the brush back there is a great one! Is anyone listening?! 4. I’m really pissed off at hearing that The Director of the Parks and Recreation Department, Mr, Buenconsejo, can’t figure out what to do with the leftover batteries, oils, and needles littering our shorline areas in a PUBLIC BEACH PARK which happens to be adjacent to a community youth center! Mr. Buenconsejo’s complete disregard for the health and safety of our beachgoing public and our natural shoreline areas along with his inability to find safe way to dispose of the toxic and hazardous waste (that he is obviously aware of) suggest to me that he’s not even close to being qualified to manage our public areas. 5. While I am sympathetic to anyone that is homeless for any reason, I am not sympathetic to anyone that allows our natural public areas to be desecrated with trash, hazardous waste, needles, human waste, etc, etc. I don’t blame the homeless for this, I blame the administration at the Parks and Recreation Department and the lack of leadership in the Mayor’s Office. The Big Island Mayor just set up a Safe Zone for homeless folks that provides showers, restrooms, social services, and other resources to help people get back on their feet and to keep people from living on the beach. It won’t solve all the problems, but it’s a creative program that doesn’t cost much money. In fact, with a caretaker and a few improvements, the Lime Kiln area could, in fact, be an awesome safe zone for homeless people, but it would need some management and administration skills that are non-existent at The Parks and Recreation Department at this time. 6. I’m looking forward to hearing what the Environmental Protection Agency says about our Park Director acknowledging that we have batteries, oil and needles in a shoreline area, in a Public Beach Park, next to a Community Youth Center. 7. I could tell Mr. Buenconsejo where to put the hazardous waste, but then I’d be doing his job. 8. The comment about homeless folks knowing exactly when the Park Rangers are out there is laughable. Do they send out announcements or something? Geez!

*This is an excerpt from that full story “Baldwin Beach” originally posted on MauiNews.com

https://youtu.be/Z3bNXJuqHa0

Museum of the Sea: Submerged Shipwrecks, Sunken Aircraft, and Maui’s WWII history | Hawaii.com

Museum of the Sea: Submerged Shipwrecks, Sunken Aircraft, and Maui’s WWII history | Hawaii.com

Museum of the Sea: Submerged Shipwrecks, Sunken Aircraft, and Maui’s WWII history | Hawaii.com

Join us for our upcoming Sea Talk presented by Dr. Hans Van Tilburg. He has taught university courses in world and maritime history, edited readers and proceedings, and authored reports, chapters, articles and book reviews, as well as several books. He is currently the maritime heritage coordinator for the Maritime Heritage Program in the Pacific…

Source: www.hawaii.com/event/museum-sea-submerged-shipwrecks-sunken-aircraft-mauis-wwii-history/

Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island

Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island: Traditions of Oahu: Asia-Pacific Digital Library

Seasons and Months: Stories of an Ancient Island: Traditions of Oahu: Asia-Pacific Digital Library

Seasons and Months

As in most tropical climates, there are two seasons in Hawai’i, the cooler wetter season called Ho’oilo, and the hotter, drier season called Kau. Both seasons last about six months. In ancient times, the months were marked by the appearance of different stars and constellations in the eastern sky at sunset.  Source: apdl.kcc.hawaii.edu/oahu/stories/months.htm

Where has all the Limu Gone?

Where has all the Limu Gone? Maui used to have an abundant resource of edible and useful seaweed. It was harvested, eaten, and utilized as part of the traditional Hawaiian culture and in more modern times. Throughout history Maui beaches and shorelines were synonymous with seaweed. In the modern era there had been so much seaweed and algae (including both native and non-native varieties) that huge rafts of seaweed would wash ashore on many beaches building up daily. Many people picked up the fresh limu daily, for food and for other uses. If left exposed on the beach, the seaweed would start rotting and could get quite stinky. This “stinky seaweed” problem was even the cause of many complaints, to the point where some resorts had even dedicated large beach-cleaning machines to clear away the almost daily deposits of seaweed. Huge seaweed deposits were common sites on, the north shore, south shore, and west side. But in the last 2 decades, most of that has suddenly disappeared? So why after so many decades of excessive seaweed did it suddenly vanish on all three coastlines?

beachmaster-machine-clearing-limu-seaweed-in kihei-maui-hawaii
Beachmaster tractor clearing away seaweed deposits on a Kihei Beach, Maui Hawaii.